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Program

(see also Program at a glance)

Thursday, October 11, 2007

7:30am – 8:15am
Breakfast

8:15am – 8:30am
Opening Remarks, Housekeeping

8:30am – 9:30am
Opening Keynote: Web 2.0, Library 2.0, Librarian 2.0 – solving problems with buzzwords

Library 2.0 as a concept is not complicated and not even that new. Making institutions interactive and more flexible and responsive to their patrons is a necessary part of being part of the networked world. As technology knowledge becomes mandatory for participation in society, libraries are becoming one of very few bridges spanning the digital divide.

Speakers:
Jessamyn West (Community Technologist, librarian.net)

8:30am – 9:30am
Archiving the NEPTUNE and VENUS observatories data

VideoPowerPoint

The VENUS and NEPTUNE cabled ocean observatories are going to produce an estimated total of about 47 TB of data year. Dealing with the storage and retrieval of this data is the role of the Data Management and Archiving System currently being developed. More importantly, ways and means to collect processed data, paper references and other anciliary information from scientists for the sake of linking it back with the original data will be more of a challenge and an area where library experience will hopefully come to our help.

Speakers:
Benoît Pirenne (Associate Director, IT, Neptune Canada)

10:15am – 10:45am
Coffee

10:45am – 11:30am
The Talis Platform

Video – PowerPoint

The concepts behind the Talis Platform were first introduced by Paul Miller at Access 2006. Richard Wallis demonstrated it live at Code4Lib 2007.
See how it is now being used by others, and by Talis, to deliver real applications. Find out how you can try it for yourself.

Speakers:
Richard Wallis (Technology Evangelist, Talis)

11:30am – 12:00pm
Hackfest Report 1

Video
12:00pm – 1:00pm
Lunch

1:00pm – 1:45pm
Forget the Lipstick, This Pig Needs a Complete Makeover

Video – PowerPoint

McMaster University Library recently gave their OPAC (er, Pig) a complete makeover with the implementation of the Endeca Information Access Platform. This session discusses some of the issues we faced and decisions we made in order to improve both the overall search functionality and the user interface, and highlights some future plans.

Speakers:
Amanda Etches-Johnson (User Experience Librarian, McMaster University)

1:45pm – 2:45pm
ILS Options for Academic Libraries

PowerPoint

Several significant changes in the academic ILS marketplace over the past year are forcing most of us to seriously evaluate our current ILS vendor. The session will include an environmental scan of the ILS market in Canada supplemented by personal evaluations of the major ILS players including, but not limited to, Ex Libris/Voyager, III, SirsiDynix and Evergreen, a relatively new open source solution.

Speakers:
Allan Bell (Associate University Librarian, University of Waterloo)
Su Cleyle (Associate University Librarian, Memorial University of Newfoundland)
Slavko Manojlovich (Associate University Librarian (IT), Memorial University of Newfoundland)
Brian Owen (Associate University Librarian, Simon Fraser University)

2:45pm – 3:15pm
Coffee

3:15pm – 4:00pm
Scholarly Reading Interface to Renaissance English Knowledgebase

Video – PowerPoint

The Renaissance English Knowledgebase (REKn) contains a combination of digital representations of primary literary and artistic works of the Renaissance (some 13,000 works at present), plus secondary materials reflecting our understanding of these earlier works (some 100,000). These materials are accessed through a reading interface, PReE, supported by a database system that facilitates their navigation and dynamic interaction, also providing access to inquiry-oriented analytical tools beyond simple search functions. The effect is that of providing an expert reading environment for those in our field, one that encourages close, comprehensive reading at the same time as it provides, conveniently, the building blocks of broad-based research inquiry.
My talk will discuss REKn and PReE from both theoretical and pragmatic perspectives, focusing on the way in which an advanced computational approach can add significant value to the way in which one interacts with such materials.

Speakers:
Ray Siemens (Canada Research Chair, Humanities Computing, University of Victoria)

4:00pm – 5:00pm
Repository Redux

Video – PowerPoint

The University of Prince Edward Island has embarked on a substantial project to support the institutions Administrative, Learning and Research communities using a Web 2.0/3.0 framework and the Fedora/Drupal/Moodle systems as the foundation. The session will describe the architecture and demo some of the core systems, such as Learn@UPEI, UPEI VRE (Virtual Research Environment) and some sample digital library collections.

Speakers:
Mark Leggott (University Librarian, University of Prince Edward Island)

Friday, October 12, 2007

7:30am – 8:15am
Breakfast

8:15am – 8:30am
Opening Remarks, Housekeeping

8:30am – 9:30am
Open ILS, Web 2.0 and multitype provincial library initiatives in BC
In April, 2007, the Association of BC Public Library Directors and the BC Public Library Services Branch agreed to implement the Evergreen Open ILS for all of BC (BC Pines). PLSB is also working with BiblioCommons to provide BC public library users with an exciting new social search and discovery layer to integrate with Evergreen and other major ILS’s. Find out where things are 6 months later, and what’s coming next

Speakers:
Ben Hyman (Manager, Policy and Technology, Public Library Services Branch)
Beth Jefferson (Founder, Bibliocommons)

9:30am – 10:15am
Image markup and Web applications

VideoPowerPoint

IMaP is a tool for the markup and display of very large images on the web. It is mostly used for displaying maps with overlays, but can be used to display any image. Images can be marked up with the HCMC Image Markup Tool or the open source Inkscape drawing program. The Scraps project will produce a web-based system to mark up and display multi-level digitized artifacts, such as scrapbooks, albums, etc. The Image Markup Tool is used to mark up the digitized images. The Scraps administration program uses the IMT files and other user-supplied data to create a hierarchical structure that is displayed by the Scraps viewer. Users can drill down through the layers of the hierarchy to view embedded objects.

Speakers:
Martin Holmes (Humanities Computing, Research and Development, University of Victoria)
Chris Petter (Digital Projects Librarian, University of Victoria)

10:15am – 10:45am
Coffee

10:45am – 11:30am
Thunder Talks

Video

11:30am – 12:00pm
Hackfest Report II

Video

12:00pm – 1:00pm
Lunch

1:00pm – 1:45pm
Darth Vader, Open Access, and Digital Libraries: What is the Future of Electronic Collections?

Video – PowerPoint

This session will look at the complexities of open and closed access business models used to create digital libraries. Often, those of us in the academic world, tend to think of open access models as “good” and closed ones as “evil.” The reality, however, is much more complex. Digitization costs money, lots of it, and, at the same time has to respect the ability of authors (both corporate and scholarly) to benefit from their work whether through monetary profit or through promotion and tenure. Therefore, the question for all of those who wish to provide access to digital libraries is how do we navigate between these different philosophies? In other words, how do we eliminate both the “Dark Side” (closed access), and the “Light Side” (open access) and create a “Gray Side” (compromise)?

Speakers:
Shawn Martin (Text Creation Partnership Project Librarian, University of Michigan)

1:45pm – 2:45pm
Alouette Canada Progress Report

AlouetteCanada (http://www.alouettecanada.ca), led by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries, provides support for enduring access to Canadian digitized content by developing standards and tools for the creation and management of content, for the normalization and supplementation of metadata, and for resource discovery and use through a centralized portal. This session reports on AlouetteCanada’s status and accomplishments during its first 18 months of activity.

Speakers:
Brian Bell (Director, Alouette Canada, Alouette Canada)
Mark Jordan (Head of Library Systems, Simon Fraser University Library)
Walter Lewis (Technical Lead, OurOntario)

2:45am – 3:15pm
Coffee

3:15pm – 4:00pm
Genius Loci: Libraries in Transition

PowerPoint 1PowerPoint 2

Our success in providing electronic access to information — ejournals, ebooks, mass digitization, collaborative storage of print copies — is paving the way for the disappearance of the physical library… or is it?

What should we be addressing right now in our organizations to seize the opportunities and meet the challenges of the continuing shift to networked and open access? What clues do we have from our users? Drawing on the results of the 2007 Canadian Consortial LibQUAL+ survey and on their amiably conflicting perspectives, the speakers will paint two different scenarios for tomorrow’s academic library and the organizational implications of each.

Speakers:
John Durno (IT Coordinator, University of Victoria)
Martha Whitehead (Associate University Librarian, Queen’s University)

4:00pm – 4:45pm
Data-Cyberinfrastructure Collaboration at the University of California, San Diego

VideoPowerPoint

In recent years both the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) have released reports on the coming need for appropriate cyberinfrastructure for engineering, sciences, social sciences and humanities disciplines. An important question for any research library is where and how they will fit into the cyberinfrastructure model that is native to their campus, community and or university system?

At the University of California, San Diego, the University Libraries are actively pursuing this agenda by working collaboratively with the San Diego Supercomputer Center to build an intersect of personnel, expertise, and services to provide long-term preservation of and access to research data and enable domain scientists and researchers to carry-out longitudinal complex data analysis to support interdisciplinary research. Presenters will describe the collaborative model, identify benefits and challenges, give a brief outline of the projects already underway, expose the key components of the technical architecture, and discuss future plans.

Speakers:
Luc Declerck (Associate University Librarian, Technology Services, UCSD)
Declan Fleming (Director, IT Department, UCSD Libraries)

4:45pm – 5:30pm
BoFS (Birds of a Feather)

Saturday, October 13, 2007

7:30am – 8:15am
Breakfast

8:15am – 8:30am
Opening Remarks, Housekeeping

8:30am – 9:30am
Searching the OPAC: The State of Play

VideoPowerPoint

In the past few years libraries have started to take action on their dissatisfaction (and their users’ indifference) towards their OPACs. The concurrent emergence of options for search interfaces outside the ILS and the wide adoption of Web 2.0 applications by our users have provided both a carrot and a stick. This session will examine the current range of possibilities for improving search functionalities in, around and begainst the OPAC.

Speakers:
Peter Binkley (Digital Initiatives Technology Librarian, University of Alberta Libraries)

9:30am – 10:30am
Open Source Software as a Service

Video – PowerPoint

Many in the library industry are excited about the recent availability of companies offering commercial support for ‘Enterprise Open Source’ solutions. This session discusses the successes and challenges of operating a high-growth open source business in the library industry from the point of view of the owners/operators of one such company. Questions and issues to be raised and discussed include: Why the need for commercial support for open source? How can the needs of a business be balanced with those of an open source project? What challenges to the success of this business model exist in the library industry? How can open source companies successfully collaborate (i.e., avoid a fork) while competing on services? Should libraries try to convince more library companies to “Go Open”? If so, how can they plead the case? How scalable is the “Sponsored Development” model, where customers are responsible for providing resources for feature development?

Speakers:
Joshua Ferraro (President, Technology, LibLime)

10:30am – 11:00am
Coffee

11:00am – 12:00pm
Observing Student Researchers in their Native Habitat

Video – PowerPoint

Understanding how students in real world situations go about conducting research is essential to ensuring that library resources are best positioned to meet their needs. This presentation will reveal key findings of an ethnographic study observing students in the context of performing research for actual course assignments. Learn how students approach their research tasks, how they regard web search engines and how they interact with scholarly electronic resources. Review of study methods and select video clips will be included.

Speakers:
Jane Burke (Vice President and General Manager, Serials Solutions)

12:00pm – 1:00pm
Closing Keynote: Leveraging the Power of the Grid

Video – PowerPoint

The Internet and technologies that enable a high level of interoperability among disparate systems (often dubbed Web 2.0 applications) are creating a rich environment of services that libraries can exploit to better serve their users. This presentation will explore some of these “grid” services and the challenges and opportunities they present for libraries.

Speakers:
Roy Tennant (Senior Program Officer, OCLC)

1:00pm – 1:10pm
Closing Remarks